CENTER NEWS

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Published in the YourHub section of the Denver Post: "COVID-19 Increases Global Hunger, Local

Non-Profit Responds," written by Dr Don Messer.

In honor of Father's Day, Dr Messer speaks to the Northglenn UMC Congregation about the 361 AIDS orphans the Center sponsors in Kenya, and in particular, those that their wonderful church helps.  

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Dr Messer shares the impact of COVID-19 on increasing worldwide hunger in this podcast.  

Dr Don Messer, Executive Director of the Center for Health and Hope, Reflects on Race in America and His Experience Marching with Martin Luther King Jr.  

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Center Sponsors Three India Seminars: 

Facing LGBTQ & AIDS Discrimination

How can I become a professional social worker when I believe the Bible condemns LGBTQ persons?" was the question posed to Center Executive Director Dr. Don Messer at one of three seminars sponsored in India.  Attendees were eager to expand their knowledge both of HIV and what it means to be gay, lesbian, bi-sexual, or transgendered. 

 

Participants were persons of Hindu, Muslim, Buddhist, & Christian backgrounds, seeking insight and information at conferences in Calcutta, Chennai, and Trichy.   "People struggle with dysfunctional faiths that betray their own rationality or noble impulses toward acceptance," says Messer.  "These seminars are  one key  way the Center seeks to encourage inclusiveness and stamp out stigma."    

See Messer's detailed India Report here.

Global AIDS: Nearly Over or Still Flourishing?

Rev. Dr. Donald E. Messer, Executive Director of the Center for Health and Hope, traveled to Amsterdam to participate in the 22nd International AIDS Conference. He wrote an article for the United Methodist News Service.

"Measuring whether the HIV and AIDS pandemic is nearly over or still flourishing depends on where you live and whether you see the proverbial glass half-full or half-empty.

 

If you are among the 60 percent of the 37 million people infected in the world who have access to life-saving treatment, your perspective will be different than the 40 percent still threatened by the disease. 

 

Speakers at the July 23-27 22rd International AIDS Conference in Amsterdam, Netherlands, which drew some 15,000 participants, celebrated glowing progress made in recent years in reducing infections and deaths in certain parts of the world..."